“I give command, and I bring them: Giants are coming to fulfill my wrath”


◄ Isaiah 13 ►
Brenton Septuagint Translation
A Judgment against Babylon
1THE VISION WHICH ESAIAS SON OF AMOS SAW AGAINST BABYLON.

2Lift up a standard on the mountain of the plain, exalt the voice to them, beckon with the hand, open the gates, ye rulers.

3I give command, and I bring them: giants are coming to fulfil my wrath, rejoicing at the same time and insulting.

4A voice of many nations on the mountains, even like to that of many nations; a voice of kings and nations gathered together: the Lord of hosts has given command to a war-like nation,

5to come from a land afar off, from the utmost foundation of heaven; the Lord and his warriors are coming to destroy all the world.

6Howl ye, for the day of the Lord is near, and destruction from God shall arrive.

7Therefore every hand shall become powerless, and every soul of man shall be dismayed.

8The elders shall be troubled, and pangs shall seize them, as of a woman in travail: and they shall mourn one to another, and shall be amazed, and shall change their countenance as a flame.

9For behold! the day of the Lord is coming which cannot be escaped, a day of wrath and anger, to make the world desolate, and to destroy sinners out of it.

10For the stars of heaven, and Orion, and all the host of heaven, shall not give their light; and it shall be dark at sunrise, and the moon shall not give her light.

11And I will command evils for the whole world, and will visit their sins on the ungodly: and I will destroy the pride of transgressors, and will bring low the pride of the haughty.

12And they that are left shall be more precious than gold tried in the fire; and a man shall be more precious than the stone that is in Suphir.

13For the heaven shall be enraged, and the earth shall be shaken from her foundation, because of the fierce anger of the Lord of hosts, in the day in which his wrath shall come on.

14And they that are left shall be as a fleeing fawn, and as a stray sheep, and there shall be none to gather them: so that a man shall turn back to his people, and a man shall flee to his own land.

15For whosoever shall be taken shall be overcome; and they that are gathered together shall fall by the sword.

16And they shall dash their children before their eyes; and they shall spoil their houses, and shall take their wives.

17Behold, I will stir up against you the Medes, who do not regard silver, neither have they need of gold.

18They shall break the bows of the young men; and they shall have no mercy on your children; nor shall their eyes spare thy children.

19And Babylon, which is called glorious by the king of the Chaldeans, shall be as when God overthrew Sodoma, and Gomorrha.

20It shall never be inhabited, neither shall any enter into it for many generations: neither shall the Arabians pass through it; nor shall shepherds at all rest in it.

21But wild beasts shall rest there; and the houses shall be filled with howling; and monsters shall rest there, and devils shall dance there,

22and satyrs shall dwell there; and hedgehogs shall make their nests in their houses. It will come soon, and will not tarry.

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Lilith the Night Hag

This post is a work in progress and will be continuously updated with new info. Please check back.

Lilith (Hebrew: לִילִית‎ Lîlîṯ) is a Hebrew name for a figure in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud, who is generally thought to be in part derived from a historically far earlier class of female demons (līlīṯu) in Mesopotamian religion, found in cuneiform texts of Sumer, Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia.

Evidence in later Jewish materials is plentiful, but little information has been found relating to the original Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian view of these demons. The relevance of two sources previously used to connect the Jewish lilith to an Akkadian lilitu—the Gilgamesh appendix and the Arslan Tash amulets—are now both disputed by recent scholarship. The two problematic sources are discussed below.

The Hebrew term lilith or lilit (translated as “night creatures”, “night monster”, “night hag”, or “screech owl”) first occurs in Isaiah 34:14, either singular or plural according to variations in the earliest manuscripts, though in a list of animals. In the Dead Sea Scrolls “Songs of the Sage” the term first occurs in a list of monsters. In Jewish magical inscriptions on bowls and amulets from the 6th century BC onwards, Lilith is identified as a female demon and the first visual depictions appear.

In Jewish folklore, from Alphabet of Ben Sira onwards, Lilith becomes Adam’s first wife, who was created at the same time (Rosh Hashanah) and from the same earth as Adam. This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam’s ribs. The legend was greatly developed during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadic midrashim, the Zohar, and Jewish mysticism. For example, in the 13th century writings of Rabbi Isaac ben Jacob ha-Cohen, Lilith left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she coupled with the archangel Samael. The resulting Lilith legend is still commonly used as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.
The demon Lilith is represented throughout history as an owl (See Post: Owl Symbolism & Luciferianism). A study of Lilith will reveal the dark secrets behind the owl of Bohemian Grove.

Few magickal orders exist dedicated to the undercurrent of Lilith and deal in initiations specifically related to the arcana of the supposed first female. Two organizations that progressively use initiations and magick associated with Lilith are the Ordo Antichristianus Illuminati and the Order of Phosphorus. Author Joshua Seraphim has written three texts associated with the egregore of Lilith entitled “Rite of Lilith,” “Confessionis ex Lilitu,” and the “Lamentations of Lilith.”

Lilith appears as a succubus (See Post: The Incubus & Succubus) in Aleister Crowley’s De Arte Magica. Lilith was also one of the middle names of Crowley’s first child, Ma Ahathoor Hecate Sappho Jezebel Lilith Crowley (b. 1904, d.1906). She is sometimes identified with Babylon in Thelemic writings.

Semitic legend describes Lilith as having a “base” nature and a taste for biting Adam and drinking his blood. According to legend, she had apparently refused to submit to Adam’s authority and in a fit of pique, she uttered the ineffable name of God and flew up into the air, only to be cast down by God into the desert wastes where she took up residence. (The only mention of Lilith by name in the standard Christian Bible is in Isaiah, where a passing reference is made about her living in the desert.)

Yeshayah (Isaiah) 34:13-15 – Orthodox Jewish Bible (OJB)

13 And sirim (thorns) shall come up in her citadels, nettles and brambles in the strongholds thereof; and it shall become the habitation of jackals, and the abode for banot ya’anah (ostriches).

14 The tziyyim (martens) shall also encounter iyyim (wild cats), and a sa’ir (wild goat) calls to its companion, and lilit (night creature) dwells there and finds for itself a mano’ach (place of rest).

15 There shall the kipoz (bittern) nest, and lay eggs, and hatch and care for young under her tzel; there shall the dayyot (kites, vultures) also be gathered, every one with its mate.

Isaiah 34:13-15 – King James Version (KJV)

13 And thorns shall come up in her palaces, nettles and brambles in the fortresses thereof: and it shall be an habitation of dragons, and a court for owls.

14 The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.

15 There shall the great owl make her nest, and lay, and hatch, and gather under her shadow: there shall the vultures also be gathered, every one with her mate.

Lilith is described as either a winged serpent or a screech owl (or a anthropomorphic combination thereof) who murders infants (it would appear from the perspective of modern medicine that infants who succumbed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome would have been thought to have been victims of Lilith), and who torments men at night who sleep alone – the original succubus (See Post: Incubus & Succubus).

In modern mythology Lilith has become a symbol to many feminists of the independent woman, who refuses to submit to the control of men. While this is certainly an aspect of her egregore, there is a strong sexual component to Lilith’s nature that must also be recognized. She is more than just an “uppity woman”, she is the power of primal lust in female form. And also, she is Death, which cannot be ignored.

From Wikipedia:

A night hag is a fantastic creature from the folklore of various peoples which is used to explain the phenomenon of sleep paralysis (See Post: Sleep Paralysis). It is a phenomenon during which a person feels a presence of a supernatural malevolent being which immobilizes the person as if sitting on his/her chest. The word “night-mare” or “nightmare” was used to describe this phenomenon before the word acquired its modern, more general meaning. Various cultures have various names for this phenomenon and/or supernatural character.

  • In Scandinavian folklore, sleep paralysis is caused by a mare, a supernatural creature related to incubi and succubi (See Post: The Incubus & Succubus). The mare is a damned woman, who is cursed and her body is carried mysteriously during sleep and without her noticing. In this state, she visits villagers to sit on their rib cages while they are asleep, causing them to experience nightmares. The Swedish film Marianne examines the folklore surrounding sleep paralysis.
  • Folk belief in Newfoundland, South Carolina and Georgia describe the negative figure of the hag who leaves her physical body at night, and sits on the chest of her victim. The victim usually wakes with a feeling of terror, has difficulty breathing because of a perceived heavy invisible weight on his or her chest, and is unable to move i.e., experiences sleep paralysis. This nightmare experience is described as being “hag-ridden” in the Gullah lore. The “Old Hag” was a nightmare spirit in British and also Anglophone North American folklore.
  • In Fiji, the experience is interpreted as kana tevoro, being “eaten” by a demon. In many cases the demon can be the spirit of a recently dead relative who has come back for some unfinished business, or has come to communicate some important news to the living. Often persons sleeping near the afflicted person say kania, kania, “eat! eat!” in an attempt to prolong the possession for a chance to converse with the dead relative or spirit and seek answers as to why he or she has come back. The person waking up from the experience is often asked to immediately curse or chase the spirit of the dead relative, which sometimes involves literally speaking to the spirit and telling him or her to go away or using expletives.
  • In Nigeria, “ISP appears to be far more common and recurrent among people of African descent than among whites or Nigerian Africans,” and is often referred to within African communities as “the Devil on your back.”
  • In Turkey sleep paralysis is called Karabasan, and is similar to other stories of demonic visitation during sleep. A supernatural being, commonly known as a jinn (cin in Turkish), comes to the victim’s room, holds him or her down hard enough not to allow any kind of movement, and starts to strangle the person. To get rid of the demonic creature, one is expected to pray to Allah by reading Al-Falaq and Al-Nas from the Qur’an. Moreover, in some derivatives of the stories, the jinn has a wide hat and if the person can show the courage and take its hat, the djinn becomes his slave.
  • In Thailand it is believed that sleep paralysis and discomfort is caused by a ghost of the Thai folklore known as Phi Am (Thai: ผีอำ). Some people claim that this spirit may even cause bruises. Stories about this spirit are common in Thai comics.
  • In the Southern states of the United States, it is sometimes referred to as “witch riding”.
  • In Eastern Chinese folklore, it is thought that a mouse can steal human breath at night. Human breath strengthens the mouse, allowing it longevity and the ability to briefly become human at night, in a similar fashion to fox spirits. The mouse sits near the person’s face or under their nostrils.
  • In Chinese culture, sleep paralysis is widely known as “鬼壓身/鬼压身” (pinyin: guǐ yā shēn) or “鬼壓床/鬼压床” (pinyin: guǐ yā chuáng), which literally translate into “ghost pressing on body” or “ghost pressing on bed.” A more modern term is “夢魘/梦魇” (pinyin: mèng yǎn).
  • In Japanese culture, sleep paralysis is referred to as kanashibari (金縛り), literally “bound or fastened in metal,” from “kane” (metal) and “shibaru” (to bind, to tie, to fasten). This term is occasionally used by English speaking authors to refer to the phenomenon both in academic papers and in pop psych literature.
  • In Korean culture, sleep paralysis is called gawi nulim (Hangul: 가위눌림), literally, “being pressed down by something scary in a dream.” It is often associated with a belief that a ghost or spirit is lying on top of or pressing down on the sufferer.
  • In Mongolian culture, nightmares in general as well as sleep paralysis is referred to by the verb-phrase khar darakh (written kara darahu), meaning “to be pressed by the Black” or “when the Dark presses.” Kara means black, and may refer to the dark side personified. Kharin buu means “shaman of the black” (shamans of the dark side only survive in far-northern Mongolia), while tsaghaan zugiin buu means “shaman of the white direction” (referring to shamans who only invoke benevolent spirits). Compare ‘karabasan’ (the dark presser) in Turkish, which may date from pre-Islamic times when the Turks had the same religion and mythology as the Mongols. See Mythology of the Turkic and Mongolian peoples and Tengriism.
  • In Tibetan culture, sleep paralysis is often known as dip-non (གྲིབ་གནོན་ – Kham) or dip-phok (གྲིབ་ཕོག་ – Ladakh), which translates roughly as “oppressed/struck by dip“; dip, literally meaning shadow, refers to a kind of spiritual pollution.
  • In Cambodian, Lao, and Thai culture sleep paralysis is called phǐǐ am (Thai pronunciation: [pʰǐi.ʔam], Lao pronunciation: [pʰǐi.ʔàm]) and khmout sukkhot. It is described as an event in which the person is sleeping and dreams that one or more ghostly figures are nearby or even holding him or her down. The sufferer is unable to move or make any noises. This is not to be confused with pee khao and khmout jool, ghost possession.
  • In Hmong culture, sleep paralysis is understood to be caused by a nocturnal pressing spirit, dab tsog. Dab tsog attacks “sleepers” by sitting on their chests, sometimes attempting to strangle them. Some believe that dab tsog is responsible for sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), which claimed the lives of over 100 Southeast Asian immigrants in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Adler (2011) offers a biocultural perspective on sleep paralysis and the sudden deaths. She suggests that an interplay between the Brugada syndrome (a genetic cardiac disorder) and the traditional meaning of a dab tsog attack are at the heart of the sudden deaths.
  • In Vietnamese culture, sleep paralysis is called ma đè, meaning “held down by a ghost,” or bóng đè, meaning “held down by a shadow.”
  • In Philippine culture, bangungot has traditionally been attributed to nightmares. People who claim to survive such nightmares report symptoms of sleep paralysis.
  • In New Guinea, people refer to this phenomenon as Suk Ninmyo, believed to originate from sacred trees that use human essence to sustain its life. The trees are said to feed on human essence during night as to not disturb the human’s daily life, but sometimes people wake unnaturally during the feeding, resulting in the paralysis.
  • In Malay of Malay Peninsula, sleep paralysis is known as kena tindih (or ketindihan in Indonesia), which means “being pressed.” Incidents are commonly considered the work of a malign agency; occurring in what are explained as blind spots in the field of vision, they are reported as demonic figures.
  • In Kashmiri mythology this is caused by an invisible creature called a pasikdhar or a sayaa. Some people believe that a pasikdhar lives in every house and attacks somebody if the house has not been cleaned or if god is not being worshiped in the house. One also experiences this if one has been doing something evil or derives pleasure from the misfortunes of others.
  • In Pakistan, sleep paralysis is considered an encounter with Shaitan (Urdu: شيطان ) (Satan), evil jinns or demons who have taken over one’s body. Like Iran, this ghoul is known as bakhtak (Urdu: بختک) or ‘ifrit’. It is also assumed that it is caused by the black magic performed by enemies and jealous persons. People, especially children and young girls, wear Ta’wiz (Urdu: تعویز) (Amulet) to ward off evil eye. Spells, incantations and curses could also result in ghouls haunting a person. Some homes and places are also believed to be haunted by evil ghosts, satanic or other supernatural beings and they could haunt people living there especially during the night. Muslim spiritual persons (Imams, Maulvis, Sufis, Mullahs, Faqirs) perform exorcism on individuals who are believed to be possessed. The homes, houses, buildings and grounds are blessed and consecrated by Mullahs or Imams by reciting Qur’an and Adhan (Urdu: أَذَان), the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin.
  • In Bangladesh, the phenomenon of sleep paralysis is referred to as boba (“speechless”).
  • In Tamil Nadu and Sri Lankan Tamil culture, this particular phenomenon is referred to as Amuku Be or Amuku Pei meaning “the ghost that forces one down.”
  • In Nepal, especially Newari culture it is also known as Khyaak, after a ghost-like figure believed to reside in the darkness under the staircases of a house.
  • In Pashto or Pakhtoon culture, it is known as “Khapasa”. It is believed that it is a ghost without thumb fingers. The ghost tries to suffocate you by pressing your throat and sitting on your chest. However, since the ghost has no thumbs finger that’s why it can’t suffocate effectively by using just the index and middle fingers of both hands.
  • In Arabic Culture, sleep paralysis is often referred to as Ja-thoom (Arabic: جاثوم‎), literally “What sits heavily on something”. In folklore across Arab countries, the Ja-thoom is believed to be a shayṭān or a ‘ifrīt sitting on top of the person or is also choking him. It is said that it can be prevented by sleeping on your right side and reading the Throne Verse of the Quran.
  • In Turkish culture, sleep paralysis is often referred to as karabasan (“the dark presser/assailer”). It is believed to be a creature that attacks people in their sleep, pressing on their chest and stealing their breath. However, folk legends do not provide a reason why the devil or ifrit does that.
  • In Persian culture it is known as bakhtak (Persian: بختک), which is a ghost-like creature that sits on the dreamer’s chest, making breathing hard for him/her.
  • In Kurdish culture, sleep paralysis is often referred to as motakka. It is believed to be a demon that attacks people in their sleep, and particularly children of young age, and steals their breath away as they breathe heavily and keeps it out of reach.
  • Ogun Oru is a traditional explanation for nocturnal disturbances among the Yoruba of Southwest Nigeria; ogun oru (“nocturnal warfare”) involves an acute night-time disturbance that is culturally attributed to demonic infiltration of the body and psyche during dreaming. Ogun oru is characterized by its occurrence, a female preponderance, the perception of an underlying feud between the sufferer’s earthly spouse and a “spiritual” spouse, and the event of bewitchment through eating while dreaming. The condition is believed to be treatable through Christian prayers or elaborate traditional rituals designed to exorcise the imbibed demonic elements.
  • In Zimbabwean Shona culture the word Madzikirira is used to refer something strongly pressing one down. This mostly refers to the spiritual world in which some spirit—especially an evil one—tries to use its victim for some evil purpose. The people believe that witches can only be people of close relations to be effective, and hence a witches often try to use one’s spirit to bewitch one’s relatives.
  • In Ethiopian culture the word dukak (ዱካክ, “depression”) is used, which is believed to be an evil spirit that possesses people during their sleep. Some people believe this experience is a symptom of withdrawal from the stimulant khat. The evil spirit dukak is an anthropomorphic personification of the depression that often results from the act of quitting chewing khat. ‘Dukak’ often appears in hallucinations of the quitters and metes out punishments to its victims for offending him by quitting. The punishments are often in the form of implausible physical punishments (e.g., the dukak puts the victim in a bottle and shakes the bottle vigorously) or outrageous tasks the victim must perform (e.g., swallow a bag of gravel).
  • In Swahili speaking areas of Southeast Africa, it is known as jinamizi (“Strangled by Jinn”), which refers to a creature sitting on one’s chest making it difficult for him/her to breathe. It is attributed to result from a person sleeping on his back. Most people also recall being strangled by this ‘creature’.
  • In the Moroccan culture, Sleep Paralysis is known as Bou Rattat, which means a demon that presses and covers the sleeper’s body so they cannot move or speak.
  • In Finnish folk culture sleep paralysis is called unihalvaus (dream paralysis), but the Finnish word for nightmare, painajainen, is believed to originally have meant sleep paralysis, as it’s formed from the word painaja, which translates to pusher or presser, and the diminutive suffix -nen.
  • In Hungarian folk culture sleep paralysis is called lidércnyomás (lidérc pressing) and can be attributed to a number of supernatural entities like lidérc (wraith), boszorkány (witch), tündér (fairy) or ördögszerető (demon lover). The word boszorkány itself stems from the Turkish root bas-, meaning “to press.”
  • In Iceland folk culture sleep paralysis is generally called having a Mara. A goblin or a succubus (since it is generally female) believed to cause nightmares (the origin of the word ‘Nightmare’ itself is derived from an English cognate of her name). Other European cultures share variants of the same folklore, calling her under different names; Proto-Germanic: marōn; Old English: mære; German: Mahr; Dutch: nachtmerrie; Icelandic, Old Norse, Faroese, and Swedish: mara; Danish: mare; Norwegian: mare; Old Irish: morrigain; Croatian, Bosnian, Serbian, Slovene: môra; Bulgarian, Polish: mara; French: cauchemar; Romanian: moroi; Czech: můra; Slovak: mora. The origin of the belief itself is much older, back to the reconstructed Proto Indo-European root mora-, an incubus, from the root mer- “to rub away” or “to harm.”
  • In Malta, folk culture attributes a sleep paralysis incident to an attack by the Haddiela, who is the wife of the Hares, an entity in Maltese folk culture that haunts the individual in ways similar to a poltergeist. As believed in folk culture, to get rid of the Haddiela, one must place a piece of silverware or a knife under the pillow prior to sleep.
  • In Greece and Cyprus, it is believed that sleep paralysis occurs when a ghost-like creature or Demon named Mora, Vrahnas or Varypnas (Greek: Μόρα, Βραχνάς, Βαρυπνάς) tries to steal the victim’s speech or sits on the victim’s chest causing asphyxiation.
  • In Catalonia legend and popular culture, the Pesanta is an enormous dog (or sometimes a cat) that goes into people’s houses in the night and puts itself on their chests making it difficult for them to breathe and causing them the most horrible nightmares. The Pesanta is black and hairy, with steel paws, but with holes so it can’t take anything.
  • In Sardinia, one of Italy’s islands, there is an old belief that identifies the cause of sleep paralysis in a demoniac being called “Ammuttadori”. This ghoulish creature sits in the chest of the sleeping victim, suffocating him and, sometimes, ripping the skin with his nails. It is also believed, in some parts of the island, that this demon wears seven red caps on his head: if the victim resists the pain and succeeds to steal one of the caps, he will soon find a hidden treasure as a reward.
  • In Latvian folk culture sleep paralysis is called a torture or strangling by Lietuvēns. It is thought to be a soul of a killed (strangled, drowned, hanged) person and attacks both people and domestic animals. When under attack, one must move the toe of the left foot to get rid of the attacker.
  • During the Salem witch trials several people reported night-time attacks by various alleged witches, including Bridget Bishop, that may have been caused by sleep paralysis.
  • In Mexico, it is believed that this is caused by the spirit of a dead person. This ghost lies down upon the body of the sleeper, rendering him unable to move. People refer to this as “subirse el muerto” (dead person on you).
  • In many parts of the Southern United States, the phenomenon is known as a hag, and the event is said to portend an approaching tragedy or accident.
  • In Newfoundland, it is known as the ‘Old Hag’. In island folklore, the Hag can be summoned to attack a third party, like a curse. In his 1982 book, The Terror that Comes in the Night, David J. Hufford writes that in local culture the way to call the Hag is to recite the Lord’s Prayer backwards.
  • In contemporary western culture the phenomenon of supernatural assault are thought to be the work of what are known as shadow people. Victims report primarily three different entities, a man with a hat, the old hag noted above, and a hooded figure. Sleep paralysis is known to involve a component of hallucination in 20% of the cases, which may explain these sightings. Sleep paralysis in combination with hallucinations has long been suggested as a possible explanation for reported alien abduction.
  • Several studies show that African-Americans may be predisposed to isolated sleep paralysis—known in folklore as “the witch is riding you” or “the haint is riding you.” Other studies show that African-Americans who experience frequent episodes of isolated sleep paralysis, i.e., reporting having one or more sleep paralysis episodes per month coined as “sleep paralysis disorder,” were predisposed to panic attacks. This finding has been replicated by other independent researchers.
  • In Brazil, there is a legend about a mythological being called the pisadeira (“she who steps”). She is described as a tall, skinny old woman, with long dirty nails in dried toes, white tangled hair, a long nose, staring red eyes, and greenish teeth on her evil laugh. She lives over the roofs, waiting to step on the chest of those who sleep with a full stomach.

MUST SEE VIDEO: Next Level News: Canadian Minister of Defense Announces Aliens Exist

In the following video Paul Hellyer, former defense minister of Canada talks about the existence of aliens, how the U.S. government is hiding the fact that they’re working with at least 2 of them, and how there are allegedly at least 4 different species, known as the Zeta Reticuli, Pleiadians, Orion ETs and the Tall Whites. (Many disagree with this statement. See post: ALIEN DECEPTION: Aliens Are NOT Extra-Terrestrials, They’re Extra-Dimensional Beings) Hellyer also mentions shadow governments, the ruling elite and 9/11.

VIDEOS: The Black Eyed Children

Scare level: 10,000.

Have you heard of the so-called “Black Eyed Children”? For a while now, stories have been circling the web and beyond about these creepy little kids with completely black eyes and intensely unsettling  behavior. Apparently there’s also white-eyed children but that’s fodder for a future post. Since the ’90s, the Black Eyed Kids have reportedly been seen hitchhiking, panhandling or showing up on the doorsteps of unsuspecting adults around the world.

According to Wikipedia:
The supposed origin of the legend are 1998 postings written by Texas reporter Brian Bethel on a “ghost-related mailing list” relating alleged encounters with “black eyed kids” in Abilene, Texas and Portland, Oregon. Called classic examples of Creepypasta, Bethel’s stories gained such popularity that he published a FAQ “just to keep up with demand for more info about the new urban legend”. In 2012, Brian Bethel told his story on the reality television series Monsters and Mysteries in America. He wrote a follow-up article for the Abilene Reporter News, describing his experience.

In 2012, the horror film Black Eyed Kids was produced with Kickstarter funding, its director commenting that the black-eyed children were “an urban legend that’s been floating around on the Internet for years now, I always thought it was fascinating”. A 2013 episode of MSN’s Weekly Strange that featured reports of black-eyed children is thought to have helped spread the legend on the internet.

In late September 2014, the British tabloid Daily Star ran three sensationalistic front-page stories about alleged sightings of black-eyed children, claiming a “shock rise in sightings around the world”. Alleged sightings are taken seriously by ghost hunters, some of whom believe black-eyed children to be extraterrestrials, vampires, or ghosts.

According to people who claim to have encountered these things, the black-eyed kids range in age from approximately 6 – 16, have very pale and/or blue-tinted skin and completely black eyes. They usually travel alone, in pairs or in small groups, have a tendency to only come up to adults who are by themselves, speak in a very monotone and unnatural manner and are always asking the same ominous question: “Can we come in?”. If these kids end up on an unsuspecting person’s doorstep, they supposedly knock continuously until someone finally answers the door, and for some reason they either rarely or never use the doorbell. People who claim to have encountered one or more of these kids report instant fear and fight-or-flight response, even before noticing their black eyes. If asked what they’re doing out so late or where their parents are, the kids simply ignore the questions and ask again if the person will let them into their house (or car) and occasionally add that what they need “won’t take long”. There doesn’t appear to be any stories of what would happen if someone actually obliged and allowed them into their house or to hitch a ride, leaving believers to assume that either no one ever lets them in or the ones who do end up dead or otherwise incapacitated and unable to tell the story of their experience(s).

Many people who believe these things exist say they’re likely demonic in nature, due to the fact that they’re always asking to be given permission to enter. Historically, demons are only allowed entrance into a person’s life or body if legally allowed to do so, after being granted permission or having a spiritual door opened for them.

L.A. Marzulli has recently taken an interest in the legend and offers his thoughts in the video below:

More videos on the Black Eyed Kids: