Owl Symbolism & Luciferianism

The owl is a nocturnal bird of prey. Throughout history, the owl has been associated with wisdom, books, the occult, shamanism and other spiritual matters. The owl is a bird of the night, so an association with the moon is also suggested. They have short tail feathers and are silent in flight, almost stealth-like. They seem curious about things but are happy to sit and wait until the time is right to obtain their goals (catch or conquer their prey).

The demon “goddess” Lilith is represented throughout history as an owl (See Post: Lilith the Night Hag). A study of Lilith will reveal the dark secrets behind the owl of Bohemian Grove.

According to some, Lilith was the [mythological] first wife of Adam. She, like Adam, was supposedly created by God “from the dust of the earth. . . in the image of God He created them, male and female He created them” (Gen. 1:27) being the first reference to human life in the Bible. Those who believe that Lilith was the first wife of Adam maintain that Eve came later, fashioned from a rib taken from Adam while he slept: “. . . this is to be called Woman, for this was taken from Man“. (Gen. 2:23) Some believe that Eve being created this way can only be explained by assuming that there was a female human before Eve who was made from the dust as Adam was but was done away with due to excessive pride. Since only Eve is subsequently present in the Garden of Eden, her predecessor must have departed before Eve’s arrival on the scene. Some assume that Lilith’s near total absence (aside from oblique references to “screech owls”) from the Judeo/Christian Bible is a matter of prejudice on the part of the male patriarchal authors.

Semitic legend describes Lilith as having a “base” nature and a taste for biting Adam and drinking his blood. She had refused to submit to Adam’s authority and in a fit of pique, she uttered the ineffable name of God and flew up into the air, only to be cast down by God into the desert wastes where she took up residence. (The only mention of Lilith by name in the standard Christian Bible is in Isaiah, where a passing reference is made about her living in the desert.)

Yeshayah (Isaiah) 34:13-15 – Orthodox Jewish Bible (OJB)

13 And sirim (thorns) shall come up in her citadels, nettles and brambles in the strongholds thereof; and it shall become the habitation of jackals, and the abode for banot ya’anah (ostriches).

14 The tziyyim (martens) shall also encounter iyyim (wild cats), and a sa’ir (wild goat) calls to its companion, and lilit (night creature) dwells there and finds for itself a mano’ach (place of rest).

15 There shall the kipoz (bittern) nest, and lay eggs, and hatch and care for young under her tzel; there shall the dayyot (kites, vultures) also be gathered, every one with its mate.

Isaiah 34:13-15 – King James Version (KJV)

13 And thorns shall come up in her palaces, nettles and brambles in the fortresses thereof: and it shall be an habitation of dragons, and a court for owls.

14 The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.

15 There shall the great owl make her nest, and lay, and hatch, and gather under her shadow: there shall the vultures also be gathered, every one with her mate.

Lilith is described as either a winged serpent or a screech owl (or a anthropomorphic combination thereof) who murders infants (it would appear from the perspective of modern medicine that infants who succumbed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome would have been thought to have been victims of Lilith), and who torments men at night who sleep alone – the original succubus (See Post: The Incubus & Succubus).

In modern mythology Lilith has become a symbol to many feminists of the independent woman, who refuses to submit to the control of men. While this is certainly an aspect of her egregore, there is a strong sexual component to Lilith’s nature that must also be recognized. She is more than just an “uppity woman”, she is the power of primal lust in female form. And also, she is Death, and this cannot be ignored.

OWL

oul (bath ha-ya`anah; Latin Ulula):

The name of every nocturnal bird of prey of the Natural Order Striges. These birds range from the great horned owl of 2 feet in length, through many subdivisions to the little screech-owl of 5 inches. All are characterized by very large heads, many have ear tufts, all have large eyes surrounded by a disk of tiny, stiff, radiating feathers. The remainder of the plumage has no aftershaft. So these birds make the softest flight of any creature traveling on wing. A volume could be written on the eye of the owl, perhaps its most wonderful feature being in the power of the bird to enlarge the iris if it wishes more distinct vision. There is material for another on the prominent and peculiar auditory parts. With almost all owls the feet are so arranged that two toes can be turned forward and two back, thus reinforcing the grip of the bird by an extra toe and giving it unusual strength of foot. All are night-hunters, taking prey to be found at that time, of size according to the strength. The owl was very numerous in the caves, ruined temples and cities, and even in the fertile valleys of Palestine. It is given place in the Bible because it was considered unfit for food and because people dreaded the cries of every branch of the numerous family. It appeared often, as most birds, in the early versions of the Bible; later translators seem to feel that it was used in several places where the ostrich really was intended. It would appear to a natural historian that the right bird could be selected by the location, where the text is confusing. The ostrich had a voice that was even more terrifying, when raised in the night, than that of the owl. But it was a bird of the desert, of wide range and traveled only by day. This would confine its habitat to the desert and the greenery where it joined fertile land, but would not bring it in very close touch with civilization. The owl is a bird of ruins, that lay mostly in the heart of rich farming lands, where prosperous cities had been built and then destroyed by enemies. Near these locations the ostrich would be pursued for its plumage, and its nesting conditions did not prevail. The location was strictly the owl’s chosen haunt, and it had the voice to fit all the requirements of the text. In the lists of abominations, the original Hebrew yanshuph, derived from a root meaning twilight, is translated “great owl” (see Leviticus 11:17 and Deuteronomy 14:16). It is probable that this was a bird about 2 ft. in length, called the eagle-owl. In the same lists the word koc (nuktikorax) refers to ruins, and the bird indicated is specified as the “little owl,” that is, smaller than the great owl–about the size of our barn owl. This bird is referred to as the “mother of ruins,” and the translations that place it in deserted temples and cities are beyond all doubt correct. Qippoz (echinos) occurs once (Isaiah 34:15), and is translated “great owl” in former versions; lately (in the American Standard Revised Version) it is changed to “dart-snake” (the English Revised Version “arrowsnake”). In this same description lilith (onokentauros), “a specter of night,” was formerly screech-owl, now it reads “night monster,” which is more confusing and less suggestive. The owls in the lists of abominations (Leviticus 11:17,18; Deuteronomy 14:16) are the little owl, the great owl and the horned owl. The only other owl of all those that produced such impressions of desolation in the Books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Job, and Micah is referred to in Psalms 102:6:

“I am like a pelican of the wilderness;

I am become as an owl of the waste places.”

Here it would appear that the bird habitual to the wilderness and the waste places, that certainly would be desert, would be the ostrich–while in any quotation referring to ruins, the owl would be the bird indicated by natural conditions.

(Gene Stratton-Porter)